Additional Information about the Feature Film Quest For Camelot


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Quest For Camelot

Quest For Camelot

Alternate Title: The Magic Sword: Quest For Camelot

Quest For Camelot (The Magic Sword: Quest For Camelot) (1998) Feature Length Theatrical Animated Film Quest For Camelot

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>Warner Bros. Feature Animation, Turner Feature Animation
  • Warner Bros. Feature Animation, Turner Feature Animation
  • Animated Characters: Kayley, Garrett, Baron Ruber, Cornwall, Two-Headed Dragon, Devon, Lady Juliana, King Arthur, Merlin, The Griffin, Bladebeak, Sir Lionel, Lynnit, Ayden, Singer.
  • Awards: Academy Award Nominee, Best Original Song, "The Prayer" (Music: David Foster and Carole Sager.
    Lyrics: David Foster, Tony Renis, Carole Sager and Alberto Testa), 1999.
    Golden Globe, Best Original Song - Motion Picture, David Foster, Carole Bayer Sager, Alberto Testa (Italian translation) and Tony Renis (Italian translation), For the Song "The Prayer," 1999.
    Nominee, Annie Award, Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Theatrical Feature, 1998.
    Nominee, Annie Award, Outstanding Individual Achievement for Effects Animation, Michel Gagné, 1998.
    Nominee, Artios, Best Casting for Animated Voiceover, Julie Hughes, Barry Moss and Jessica Gilburne, 1998.
    Nominee, Golden Reel Award, Best Sound Editing - Animated Feature, 1999
    .
  • Originally Released in 1998.
  • Running Time: 85 minutes.
  • Color
  • U.S.A.  U.S.A.

Alternate Titles:


Alternate Title: "The Magic Sword: Quest For Camelot."

Cartoon Production Information:


Soundtrack: "United We Stand," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Steve Perry, Courtesy of Columbia Records; "On My Father's Wings," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by The Corrs; Courtesy of Lava Records/143 Records/Atlantic Recording Corp; "Ruber," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Gary Oldman; "The Prayer," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Céline Dion, Courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment [Canada] Inc.; "I Stand All Alone," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Bryan White, Courtesy of Asylum Records/Elektra Entertainment Group; "The Bunny Hop," Written by Ray Anthony and Leonard Auletti; "If I Didn't Have You," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Eric Idle and Don Rickles; "Looking Through Your Eyes," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by The Corrs and Bryan White, The Corrs appear courtesy of Lava Records/143 Records/Atlantic Recording Corp., Bryan White appears courtesy of Asylum Records/Elektra Entertainment Group; "I Stand All Alone [Reprise]," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Bryan White, Courtesy of Asylum Records/Elektra Entertainment Group; "Superman Theme," Written by John Williams; "Looking Through Your Eyes," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Produced by Wilbur Rimes, Performed by LeAnn Rimes, Courtesy of Curb Records, Inc.; "I Stand Alone," Written by Carole Bayer Sager, David Foster and Steve Perry, Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Performed by Steve Perry, Courtesy of Columbia Records; "The Prayer," Written by Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster, Lyrics (Italian translation) by Tony Renis and Alberto Testa (uncredited); Produced by David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, Co-Produced by Tony Renis, Recorded and Mixed by Humberto Gatica, Performed by Andrea Bocelli, Courtesy of Insieme Srl/Sugar-Italy.

This film was ranked by Box Office Mojo at #6 on its list of worst openings for films at 3,000 or more theaters. It opened at $6,041,602 (26.8% of its $22,510,798 total gross) in 3,107theaters, or $1,945 per screen.


Commentary:


Many critics have griped about The Disney Company losing its magic touch with each new animated feature. But even a minor number like Hercules looks groundbreaking when compared to the Disney wanna-bes being released by other studios.

The latest example is Warner Bros.' Quest for Camelot, a pitiable specimen that, despite its Arthurian title, is more about the quest for placing demographically profitable toys on the shelves of your nearby Warner Bros. Store.

How does Quest pay homage to the Disney formula? Let me count the ways. There's Kayley, a spunky heroine (shades of Beauty and the Beast's Belle), whose father is a knight murdered by a trusted but evil servant of King Arthur (see The Lion King). Together with an enemy-turned-love-interest (Pocahontas), and a wisecracking, two-headed dragon (as per Lion King's comical sidekicks), Kayley seeks to avenge her father's death and take her politically correct place at King Arthur's round table.

(In a supreme touch of irony, one of the dragon's heads is voiced by Eric Idle, a member of the comedy group whose cult classic Monty Python and the Holy Grail explodes the same cliches that Quest for Camelot holds so dear.)

As to the other qualities one looks for in a theatrical cartoon: The animation is a few notches above TV quality, but other than a startlingly vivid scene involving a giant ogre, the movie still looks pretty routine. Despite the many celebrities doing the voicework (Idle, Don Rickles, Gary Oldman, Jane Seymour), the voices are unrecognizable as big stars and don't stand well on their own. And the songs are completely unmemorable and, in the case of the dragon's cutesy number, downright condescending.

Quest for Camelot is one of those nondescript cartoons that, I suppose, is passable for the kids. The pity is that the very work these cartoons are trying to emulate- the Disney features of the past decade- transformed animation into full-bodied work that is something beyond mere "kiddie entertainment."

Review By: Steve Bailey



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