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Hook, Line And Stinker Cartoon Picture
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Hook, Line And Stinker

Hook, Line And Stinker

Hook, Line And Stinker (1958) - Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series Hook, Line And Stinker

BCDB Rating: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3.7/5 Stars from 9 users.
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  • Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series
  • Distributed by: Warner Bros.
  • Cartoon Characters: Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Mouse.
  • Originally Released in 1958.
  • Color
  • Running Time: 5:57 minutes.
  • U.S.A.  U.S.A.
  • Buy This On DVD

Cartoon Comments:



My favorite of the Roadrunner and Coyote cartoons

Posted: August 06, 2011

My favorite of the Roadrunner and Coyote cartoons

By
I watched Looney Toons endlessly as a child and this particular cartoon was my very favorite; largely because of the wonderful, and unique score. The exciting, fast-paced and essentially cheerful song at the beginning is mirrored at the end by a more extensive version easily supporting the imagery while making it even more exciting and fun to watch. The other songs, such as the moody ditty played during the Coyote's ill-fated encounter with storm clouds, and the slowly building track leading to his falling between cliffs onboard a piano are also excellent and very unusual. This music was not at all canned, as the former review suggests. It was unique and only used in this cartoon-an experiment rarely seen in Looney Tunes. It perfectly accentuates the action and is not at all tacked on, as canned music would seem to be. Rather than being a sign of the beginning of the end of quality, this cartoon was the capper and finest example of the Roadrunner series.

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Hook, Line And Stinker

Posted: March 24, 2004

Irony abounds!

By
The RR/C gags are as superb as ever. What brings this cartoon down is its "score," the very same canned music that Chuck Jones himself was decrying when it was applied to Hanna-Barbera's assembly-line TV animation that was being cobbled together at approximately the same time as this cartoon's release. Truly, the end of a cartoon era is in sight.

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