My Reviews (1 review)



Make Mine Freedom Cartoon Picture
Make Mine Freedom

Make Mine Freedom

Make Mine Freedom (1948) Theatrical Cartoon Make Mine Freedom

BCDB Rating: 4.7 out of 5 stars 4.7/5 Stars from 4 users.
Vote Now!
Post your Comments or Review
This page has been viewed 59 times this month, and 2502 times total.

  • Theatrical Short
  • Distributed by: MGM
  • Cartoon Characters: John Q. Public, Labor Employee, Dr. Utopia, ISM Salesman.
  • Originally Released in 1948.
  • Technicolor
  • Running Time: 9:46 minutes.
  • U.S.A.  U.S.A.

Cartoon Comments:



Make Mine Freedom

Posted: June 06, 2003

the bitter irony

By
whilst modern cartoons tend to avoid overt political content (preferring instead to 'assume' that the current political system is the only way to organise society), hanna barbaras 1948 film 'make mine freedom' pulls no punches in its support for the dominant ideology of america. created as a response to the heated post war debate on the 'threat' of communistic or collectivised societies, a contemporary viewing of this film creates thoughts only of the bitter, bitter irony of its content. make mine freeedom extolls the virtues of the free market fully; fair enough, you might say, but, as the mcarthyites of the time pointed out, the benefits of this system were the personal freedoms it provided. it tells of a small time entreprenuer whos idea creates a massive industry and makes him rich. whilst this can still happen, the chances of a global corporation not having already cornered that market are of course, slight. one scene sees a man on his doorstep refuse entry to the police, he has the freedom to prevent searches and siezures. the current laws being passed by the bush administration have seen an end to that freedom. another scene extols the virtues of a system which allows the formation of unions. today pf course unions are frowned upon, and even the right to peacably assemble mentioned has been reduced to groups of no more than four people.
all in all this cartoon makes us pine for a past which has been stolen; the freedoms it uses as justification for capitalism have all gone. its a really interesting look at the ideals that our system as founded on, but ultimately it makes us simply long for a past which is lost forever.

6 of 12 people found this comment useful
Was this comment useful to you?

Add your own Review